EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH

Keyword: Nigeria

3 results found.

Research Article
Diversification and Economic Growth in Nigeria (1981–2016): An Econometric Approach Based on Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2020, 4(4), em0131, https://doi.org/10.29333/ejosdr/8285
ABSTRACT: Economic diversification has been the glamour of successive administrations in Nigeria, especially amidst the dwindling oil-revenue in recent years, which has resulted from the fluctuations in world crude oil prices. This study aims at investigating the impact of diversifying the economy on the economic growth in Nigeria. Secondary data on GDP growth rate as a proxy for economic growth, non-oil GDP as a proxy for GDP diversification, non-oil export as a proxy for export diversification, investment and exchange rate, between 1981 and 2016, were adopted in the study. An econometric approach of Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) was adopted to empirically analyze the collected data and the result revealed that non-oil gross domestic product impacted positively and significantly on economic growth while exchange rate had an inverse but significant nexus on economic growth in Nigeria, within the period covered in the study. However, non-oil export and investment impacted positively but insignificantly on economic growth in Nigeria. The study recommends the encouragement of increased productivity in the real sector as well as the adoption of stable and favourable exchange rate policies by the government in order to accelerate economic growth in Nigeria.
Research Article
Spatial Dimensions of Environmental Degradation in the Coastal Areas of South West
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2019, 3(3), em0088, https://doi.org/10.20897/ejosdr/3973
ABSTRACT: Environmental degradation is an increasing problem in many parts of the world and the type of ecology prevalent in an area is a major factor that determines the extent to which the area should be degraded. This study examined spatial dimension of environmental degradation prevalent in the coastal areas of south west, Nigeria. It also puts into consideration the level of severity of the environmental problems and the various ecological zones in which the surveyed communities in the study area are located. Environmental degradation is the major concept in this study and the DPSIR framework was used in understanding the concept. Mixed-method approaches, involving qualitative and quantitative methodology for data collection were used. The main techniques for primary data collection were questionnaire survey. The questionnaire was administered proportionally to 1,782 respondents who are coastal dwellers that are involved in different economic activities within the coastal areas. Both descriptive (such as frequencies, percentages, charts) and inferential (One-away Analysis of Variance and Person correlation) statistics were used for data analysis as well as cartographic analysis (map). Result shows that there is a significant variation in the spatial dynamics of environmental degradation across the sampled settlements (p<0.05). Flooding was ranked as the most severe environmental problem by larger percentages of respondents in strand ecological zone (67.0%), in deltaic swamp ecological zone (52.0%) and in mangrove ecological zone (54%). The study concludes that flooding, water hyacinth invasion and pollution which include both sewage pollution in water bodies and open refuse dumping in drainages and along road sides was reported are the most common environmental problems reported by most of the communities, whereas flooding is the most severe environmental problem that cut across the study area. Therefore, the study recommends that, rigorous community efforts are needed to provide leadership and modalities for the management of environmental challenges such as flooding in coastal communities.
Research Article
Causes of Environmental Degradation in the Coastal Areas of South West, Nigeria
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2019, 3(2), em0079, https://doi.org/10.20897/ejosdr/3969
ABSTRACT: Environmental degradation is an increasing problem in many parts of the world and the type of ecology prevalent in an area plays a major factor that determines the extent of degradation. The study examines causes of environmental degradation in coastal areas of south west Nigeria. It was propelled by environmental challenges, and identified responsible factors in the study area. Environmental degradation is the major concept in this study and the DPSIR framework was used in understanding the concept. The study was carried out using primary and secondary sources of data collection. The main techniques for primary data collection were questionnaire survey and focus group discussions. Data were collected from one thousand, seven hundred and eighty-two (1,782) sampled respondents who are coastal dwellers that are involved in economic activities within the coastal areas. The FGD was conducted in 54 settlements with a minimum of 10 discussants which constitute a mix of the elderly men and women in all the sampled communities. Secondary data were obtained from National Population Commission (2006). Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics as well as cartographic method, and the information from the FGD were analysed using a thematic approach. The study shows that waves breaking along the coastline are the main explanatory factors responsible for coastal erosion (84.0%). Flooding in the settlements where it occurs was mostly attributed to tidal rise/tidal waves (97.0%). Tidal wave was believed to be the major cause of water hyacinth (51.8%). Pollution is caused by a mixed factor of over development of coastal areas, migration to coastal areas, population growth and increased tourism. Soil infertility is caused mainly by sea water infiltration into farmlands especially when farmlands are located too close to coast lines (73%). Over development of the coastal area is mainly responsible for sand mining (67.0%). The study concludes that environmental influence remains strong in the coastal environment. Therefore, concerted community efforts are needed to provide leadership and modalities for the management of environmental challenges in coastal communities. Fundamentally, official attention should be geared towards reducing the rate at which the environment becomes degraded in the coastal communities.