EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH

Keyword: SDGs

3 results found.

Research Article
Global Finance, Competitiveness, and Sustainable Development Goals in Emerging and Least Developing Economies (ELDCs): A Review of Literature
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2020, 4(3), em0125, https://doi.org/10.29333/ejosdr/7899
ABSTRACT: This paper aims to provide a healthy review of literature on the global imperativeness of the term global finance and competitiveness to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We employed a content analysis method to significantly explore the impact of global finance on financing for sustainable development (FSD) through competitiveness. What are the lessons for ELDCs? From the reviewed literature, we observe that global financing causes a dual impact on competitiveness through the Real Effective Exchange Rate (REER) effects. The study found that global FSD on the informal sector, social and environmental factors, as well as human development, is unarguably silent. Also, there is the multiplicity of function in the global financing mix. From the literature reviewed, we observed a positive link between SDGs, global finance, and competitiveness. SDGs differ across countries because the financing approach on competitiveness differs across countries. Thus, to achieve SDGs in ELDCs, global responses should be developed around improving internal and external competitiveness. These two types of competitiveness would be encompassing. Global financing should be directed to exploring economic, social, and environmental quality in internal and external competitiveness in ELDCs. This classification would deepen the World Economic Forum (WEF) GCI 4.0 based on innovative, efficiency and factors element. Thus inclusive growth and sustainable development could be strengthened through the application of internal and external competitiveness policies that would holistically upgrade the industrial and manufacturing competitiveness frontiers and gains from the global market share frontiers to accelerate SDGs in ELDCs.
Research Article
Achieving Sustainable Development Goals in the Niger Delta: A Corporate Social Responsibility Pathway
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2019, 3(4), em0098, https://doi.org/10.29333/ejosdr/5877
ABSTRACT: Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) practice of international oil companies contributing to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals in the Niger Delta? The international community prescribes a role for business in the good of society. In a similar vein, a significant segment of the literature suggests a positive role for CSR practice. However, adequate analysis of how this is unfolding remains a task yet to be accomplished. This paper examines whether CSR practice in the aforesaid region is contributing to the attainment of SDGs. It focuses on the new CSR model – Global Memorandum of Understanding (GMoU) – initiated in 2005 and 2006 by Chevron and Shell respectively, specifically in relation to goals number one, two and three, which focus on poverty, hunger, better health, and well-being. Relying on data generated from secondary sources, the paper addresses the aforementioned question, and argues that recent oil multinational companies’ CSR practice is yet to properly respond to the development needs of local community people.
Research Article
How Can We “Take Urgent Action to Combat Climate Change and its Impact” (UN SDG N.13) under Ambiguity Aversion?
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2018, 2(2), 21, https://doi.org/10.20897/ejosdr/85339
ABSTRACT: The objective of this paper is to study in which way the strategies to combat climate change, as prescribed in the UN SDG number 13, are influenced by ambiguity aversion. Countries can tailor the UN SDGs to their priorities and situations, but the urgency in their planned actions to combat climate change and its impact is affected by the form of uncertainty surrounding their decisions. Following a Choquet-Brownian process to model ambiguity aversion on the dynamics of environmental damage, we study an international pollution control problem where countries may behave cooperatively or non-cooperatively. We show that carbon emissions decrease, as perceived ambiguity increases, in keeping with the precautionary principle, and such decrease is lower if countries behave non-cooperatively. We also examine the interrelation between the precautionary principle and the effects of a declining social discount rate and increase in population, and find that optimal policies induce more precaution. Our results have important implications for national strategies and actions to combat climate change.