European Journal of Sustainable Development Research

Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water
Ahmet Erdal Osmanlioglu 1 *
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1 Istanbul University – Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, TURKEY
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2022 - Volume 6 Issue 1, Article No: em0175
https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398

Published Online: 02 Dec 2021

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APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Osmanlioglu, 2022)
Reference: Osmanlioglu, A. E. (2022). Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water. European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 6(1), em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Osmanlioglu AE. Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water. EUR J SUSTAIN DEV RES. 2022;6(1):em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Osmanlioglu AE. Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water. EUR J SUSTAIN DEV RES. 2022;6(1), em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
Chicago
In-text citation: (Osmanlioglu, 2022)
Reference: Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal. "Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water". European Journal of Sustainable Development Research 2022 6 no. 1 (2022): em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
Harvard
In-text citation: (Osmanlioglu, 2022)
Reference: Osmanlioglu, A. E. (2022). Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water. European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 6(1), em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
MLA
In-text citation: (Osmanlioglu, 2022)
Reference: Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal "Assessment of Radioactivity Dispersion Model for Surface Water". European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, vol. 6, no. 1, 2022, em0175. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/11398
ABSTRACT
Uranium is an element commonly found in natural groundwater can be measured up to 100-500 µg per L without impact from mining. Determination of radionuclide concentrations by dispersion in the surface water is based on several mathematical models. In this paper, the main purpose of this research is to estimate the distribution of radionuclide contamination in the water body under laboratory conditions. The simplest approach in deriving radioactivity dispersion was evaluated by a laboratory-scale glass tank (60 x 60 x 60 cm) which was used for dispersion measurements in the laboratory. The box model transition test has taken into account several parameters; these are mixing ratio, transit time and decay to predict radionuclide concentrations in the water at the location of interest. Radioactive solution (650 Bq/liter) was released in the box and samples were taken from 10 cm intervals every 5 minutes. Results show that radioactivity dispersion can be predicted briefly by using this model for surface waters. Laboratory water tank measurements show that radioactivity dispersion of uranium-bearing solution in surface water compatible with the equation. Measured transition time in the field is the most valuable information that improves the ability to predict the transport and dispersion in surface water.
KEYWORDS
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