EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH

Keyword: climate change

5 results found.

Research Article
Climate Change Scare and FDI Migration
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2022, 6(3), em0191, https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/12098
ABSTRACT: Does foreign direct investment (FDI) migration into Nigeria and Sierra Leone generate a climate change scare (CCS) based on the pollution haven-halo hypothesis? The quasi-experimental design study utilized data from the world development indicator, 1970-2019 using a nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (NARDL) model to estimate the dynamic impact of FDI migration on CO2 emissions (a proxy for CCS). The study found that the change in FDI migration in Sierra Leone causes upward CO2 emissions. The positive impact of FDI migration on CO2 emission implies that the pollution haven hypothesis exists in Sierra Leone. Comparatively, dynamic FDI migration into Nigeria caused a mixed impact on CO2 emissions. The result found that an increase in FDI migration caused a decrease in CO2 emissions in Nigeria. Similarly, a decrease in FDI migration caused an increase in CO2 emissions. Also, the Wald F-test suggests a long-run asymmetry and symmetry between FDI and CO2 emissions in Sierra Leone and Nigeria, respectively. Hence, there is the presence of a pollution halo-haven issue in Nigeria. The study, therefore, recommends that green FDI financing that supports environment-friendly technology export into Nigeria and Sierra Leone that would enable optimal climate change control both in the short- and long-term. Thus, technology that efficiently improves environmental quality, preserves, and protects the ecosystem should be imported into Sierra Leone and Nigeria.
Research Article
Fossil Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions and Growth in High-Income Countries and Low-Income Countries
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2022, 6(3), em0190, https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/12084
ABSTRACT: This paper investigates the pairwise causality and co-integration that links fossil fuel consumption (FFC), carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and real gross domestic product (RGDP) between low-income countries (LIC) and high-income countries (HIC). This comparative analysis is anchored on Lv et al. (2019). Lv et al. (2019) enable the analytical framework model utilized to investigate the causality between FFC and CO2, CO2 and RGDP, and FFC and RGDP in HIC and LIC. Data were obtained from world development indicator between 1960 and 2019. The results obtained are, as follows: There exists a unidirectional causality, thus the RGDP granger causes CO2 in HIC, and no causality between RGDP and CO2 in LIC. Also, the study found no causality between FFC and RGDP, and FFC and CO2 in HIC and LIC. The mixed inter-regional causality result showed that there exists bi-directional causality between RGDP and CO2 for HIC and LIC. This implies that RGDP in LIC granger causes CO2 in HIC, and CO2 in HIC granger causes RGDP in LIC. Hence, the presence of a regional super-wicked problem. Also, CO2 in HIC granger causes FFC in LIC. The result suggests that countries should seamlessly adopt proportionate mitigation and adaptation policies to reduce the pollution transmission between economies. The non-existence of pairwise co-integration between FFC, CO2, and RGDP in HIC and LIC connotes that the CO2 reduction policy should be a short-term public policy strategy with conscious and deliberate targeting to avoid long-run growth reversal. Therefore, this paper concludes that reducing FFC may not necessarily lead to a decline in growth vice versa. Thus, to achieve a low carbon economy and a high growth regime, the global community should adopt a techno-economic paradigm model that would accelerate growth within a low-carbon economy regime to realize the 45% carbon reduction target by 2030 and the 2050 net-zero emission target.
Research Article
Exergy Analysis as a Tool for Addressing Climate Change
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2021, 5(2), em0148, https://doi.org/10.21601/ejosdr/9346
ABSTRACT: Exergy is described as a tool for addressing climate change, in particular through identifying and explaining the benefits of sustainable energy, so the benefits can be appreciated by experts and non-experts alike and attained. Exergy can be used to understand climate change measures and to assess and improve energy systems. Exergy also can help better understand the benefits of utilizing sustainable energy by providing more useful and meaningful information than energy provides. Exergy clearly identifies efficiency improvements and reductions in wastes and environmental impacts attributable to sustainable energy. Exergy can also identify better than energy the environmental benefits and economics of energy technologies. Exergy should be applied by engineers and scientists, as well as decision and policy makers, involved in addressing climate change.
Research Article
Inclusive Engagement of Indigenous Communities in Scientific Research: Opportunities and Challenges
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2020, 4(2), em0115, https://doi.org/10.29333/ejosdr/6438
ABSTRACT: Global challenges are complex, inter-disciplinary and span political boundaries. This warrants an integrative, multi-faceted approach involving the social, economic, ecological and technological disciplines. The integrative approach also needs to identify and empower local stakeholders such as indigenous communities. In this review, we provide a balanced view of opportunities and challenges which characterize the potential and insufficiencies of the current knowledge and institutional frameworks within the context of including indigenous/local communities in modern scientific research, especially in mitigating global challenges such as climate change and biodiversity loss.
Research Article
How Can We “Take Urgent Action to Combat Climate Change and its Impact” (UN SDG N.13) under Ambiguity Aversion?
European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2018, 2(2), 21, https://doi.org/10.20897/ejosdr/85339
ABSTRACT: The objective of this paper is to study in which way the strategies to combat climate change, as prescribed in the UN SDG number 13, are influenced by ambiguity aversion. Countries can tailor the UN SDGs to their priorities and situations, but the urgency in their planned actions to combat climate change and its impact is affected by the form of uncertainty surrounding their decisions. Following a Choquet-Brownian process to model ambiguity aversion on the dynamics of environmental damage, we study an international pollution control problem where countries may behave cooperatively or non-cooperatively. We show that carbon emissions decrease, as perceived ambiguity increases, in keeping with the precautionary principle, and such decrease is lower if countries behave non-cooperatively. We also examine the interrelation between the precautionary principle and the effects of a declining social discount rate and increase in population, and find that optimal policies induce more precaution. Our results have important implications for national strategies and actions to combat climate change.